We see that you have javascript disabled. Please enable javascript and refresh the page to continue reading local news. If you feel you have received this message in error, please contact the customer support team at 1-833-248-7801.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Hope's Corner: A World of Bread

"My mom would always bake a limpa rye bread of epic proportions, and fill it with candied orange peel. I am not sure to this day if the orange peel was part of her Stockholm heritage, or if she just liked candied oranges," writes Jackie Hope.

Jackie Hope BW.jpg
Jackie Hope is the longest running Dickinson Press contributor and columnist. Hope's Corner is a weekly humorous column with a message of hope.
Contributed / For The Dickinson Press
We are part of The Trust Project.

This Sunday is World Communion Sunday. Every year on the first Sunday in October, Christians around the world celebrate communion together. Our church always celebrates by baking and bringing bread from our congregants’ ethnic backgrounds.

Those of us who have good working relationships with yeast bake the bread ourselves. Others bring bakery loaves. I am hoping that this year someone in the congregation has donuts as an ethnic bread of choice.

World Communion Sunday began as World-Wide Communion Sunday in 1933 at the Shadyside Presbyterian Church in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Reverend Hugh Thompson Kerr wanted a way to express the inter-connectedness of all Christian faiths during the depth of the Great Depression. He chose the sacrament of communion as a focus to connect Christian faiths.

By 1936 the celebration was adopted by the entire U.S. Presbyterian Church. In 1940 the Federal Council of Churches, now the National Council of Churches, endorsed World-Wide Communion and began to promote it to Christian churches around the world.

Today World Communion Sunday is an ecumenical celebration of Christian unity. And ever since I was little, the United Church of Christ has celebrated the day by serving bread from all our ethnic backgrounds.

ADVERTISEMENT

My mom would always bake a limpa rye bread of epic proportions, and fill it with candied orange peel. I am not sure to this day if the orange peel was part of her Stockholm heritage, or if she just liked candied oranges. Either way, it was a once-a-year treat.

Nearly everyone else’s mom was of German descent, so we had Pumpernickel rye, Black Forest rye, and seeded rye. We also had dark Lithuanian rye because one of our town’s doctors was a refugee from Lithuania. The other town doctor was from Austria, and he took his rye bread to the Lutheran church on World Communion Sunday.

One year Mom decided to try something other than rye. She and Dad had road-tripped to Chicago and brought home baked goods from a Jewish deli. Mom decided to bake Jewish challah bread. She put the dough into the refrigerator to raise overnight. By the next morning it had covered two shelves and was heading toward a third. Mom had a supernatural power over yeast.

Her challah was even better than her rye because the challah was filled with candied fruits and raisins. Like Easter bread but without anise, and without coconut cluttering up the frosting. Mom frosted everything. And what she did not frost, she put gravy over.

This year I am baking Irish soda bread for Sunday’s communion. It has raisins in it, so you know it will be good. And I am baking a challah, too. It will not be a world-class challah, like Mom’s. I only have dough that rises and escapes the pan when I am planning caramel rolls.

And I have not yet decided whether to cover my challah with frosting or with gravy.

Jackie Hope is the longest running Dickinson Press contributor and columnist. "Hope's Corner" is a weekly humorous column centered on a message of hope for residents in southwest North Dakota.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Dickinson Press, nor Forum ownership.

Related Topics: DICKINSON
What to read next
The last thing we need is a bunch of opportunistic politicians jumping into the debate over carbon pipelines not to protect their constituents but to exact revenge on their political enemies.
Ben Hanson, a candidate for the Cass County Commission, and Sen. Kevin Cramer join this episode of Plain Talk.
The Scandia Lutheran Church in Averill, Minnesota, held its last worship service on July 17. It sold off everything that was accumulated in 123 years of service, from the altar to the communion service set to even the metal coat racks that hung in the vestibule.
It's time for state officials to get serious about this. There are too many red flags, too many convenient connections between family, political allies, and business partners, for us to believe that this deal was above board.