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Plain Talk: The winners and the losers in North Dakota's primary

The people voted. Who won? Who lost? Former NDGOP vice chairman Jim Poolman joins this episode of Plain Talk, as does long-time political operative Pat Finken, to talk it over.

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MINOT, N.D. — The North Dakota Republican Party, the dominant force in our state's politics, is deeply divided. If anyone was hoping that primary night, which saw that divide driving the debate in legislative competitions across the state, was going to resolve things they're in for a disappointment.

Republicans across the state voted, and the NDGOP remains about as divided as ever.

Did Gov. Doug Burgum's efforts to influence those races help or hurt? What will the balance of power in the party be going forward?

First Jim Poolman, former insurance commissioner and former vice chairman of the NDGOP, joined Wednesday co-host Chad Oban and me, then Pat Finken, a long-time veteran of state politics and head of the Brighter Future Alliance, chimed in.

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Opinion by Rob Port
Rob Port is a news reporter, columnist, and podcast host for the Forum News Service. He has an extensive background in investigations and public records. He has covered political events in North Dakota and the upper Midwest for two decades. Reach him at rport@forumcomm.com. Click here to subscribe to his Plain Talk podcast.
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