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Holten: The real truth about the status quo

I hate the status quo, mostly because it's boring and stale. Then again, I'm sure there are a lot of people who hate the status quo. Or are there? According to Mr. Dictionary, Mr. Status Quo is defined as "the existing state of affairs, especiall...

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I hate the status quo, mostly because it's boring and stale.

Then again, I'm sure there are a lot of people who hate the status quo. Or are there?

According to Mr. Dictionary, Mr. Status Quo is defined as "the existing state of affairs, especially regarding social or political issues." Mr. Dictionary also adds, as an example of how to use the word: "They have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo."

That's seems like such an appropriate example of use, especially during this volatile election year; "a vested interest." Mr. Status Quo always seems to be supported by those with "a vested interest."

Of course, Mr. Status Quo is not the only player on life's big stage right now. Let me also introduce you to two other important figures. They are Ms. Consistency and Mr. Change.

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Let's not confuse Ms. Consistency with Mr. Status Quo. They are two different people in that Ms. Consistency doesn't have the hanger's on in her entourage; the people with a vested interest.

But did you know that Mr. Status Quo and Mr. Change don't like each other?

Mr. Status Quo doesn't want Mr. Change to come anywhere near him and the rumor is that Mr. Status Quo even tried to get a restraining order against Mr. Change, but the judge wouldn't grant it.

If we ever do have a judge who does grant that restraining order, then we've got trouble. Because the result of keeping Mr. Status Quo away from the influences of Mr. Change is the same as having a pond of water that doesn't swirl or drain, and you know what happens to that. It gets stale, putrid and eventually rots.

But what does Mr. Status Quo use most often to defend himself? He uses a lot of excuses. The ole, "we can't do this because of this and we can't do that because of that." I hate the word "can't" as much as I hate the word status quo. In fact, I think they're twins.

I've been wondering why people often times react so combatively to change and I've come to a conclusion. It has to do with two things; a fear of their mortality and a fear of not being in control.

Have you ever heard it said that an older person is really set in their ways?

As we get older, we become more aware of the fact that life is zooming by. It's then that we try to hold onto anything we can in order to keep things the way they are.

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As a young man, my grandfather was a wrangler on a ranch where horses and oxen were essential to survival. As an old man, he watched a man walk on the moon. That's a dramatic change. You can either enjoy it, or let it torture you.

Then again, the fear of change is not restricted to those with a few years under their belt. You can fear change and/or a lack of control at any age.

Above the main doors of my high school was the quote, "Knowledge is power." In today's world, thanks to computers, notepads and smartphones, we have instant access to information, which has dramatically elevated our level of knowledge and increased our individual power.

As is the case with websites and social media outlets such as Facebook, it also gives each of us easier access to our 15 minutes of fame. And in some cases it motivates those with demented minds to act out in negative, destructive and murderous ways on what is the world's electronic stage.

Yet one benefit of this worldwide online access is that it makes it harder to maintain the status quo.

England's Prime Minister Winston Churchill said, "To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often."

He didn't say, "Perfection is the art of staying the same."

I hate Mr. Status Quo, but at the same time, I love Ms. Consistency. Let's be sure to remember that they are two different people.

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Holten
Kevin Holten

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