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McFeely: Moszer a reminder that being a cop is a job unlike almost any other

FARGO -- Next time you get pulled over for speeding and gripe about the cop being "unfriendly," think of Jason Moszer. Next time a friend at work complains about the "pig" who gave him the DUI being humorless, think of Jason Moszer. Next time you...

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FARGO -- Next time you get pulled over for speeding and gripe about the cop being "unfriendly," think of Jason Moszer. Next time a friend at work complains about the "pig" who gave him the DUI being humorless, think of Jason Moszer. Next time you watch your television set and see crowds of people protesting "out of control" police officers or cops who had to make a split-second decision that turned out tragically, think of Jason Moszer. Jason Moszer, a Fargo police officer, went to work Wednesday. He ended the day being shot by a suspect in a domestic disturbance. Jason Moszer will die.
Perhaps this is why law enforcement officers aren't always as jovial or forgiving or fun-loving as we'd like them to be. Because they can end up being struck by a bullet and dying on a random February day in one of the safest places in America. Moszer leaves behind a wife and two children, three people who'll spend the rest of their lives grieving every day about just another day when their husband and father put on the uniform and went to work. Are you worried about getting killed today at your job? When you kissed your spouse this morning before leaving for work, was there even a passing thought that you might not see them again because you'd be dead by the end of your shift? When you tucked your kids in bed last night, did you think it might be the last time you'd ever do it because you'd get shot at work? Yes, people die every day. And, no, a young cop leaving behind a family is no more tragic or impactful than any other person dying unexpectedly. Families have to push ahead every day after losing a father, mother, husband, wife or child. The difference with cops is that, no matter how rare an incident like this is, they go to work every day with the possibility of somebody trying to hurt them. Or kill them. And perhaps succeeding. A routine traffic stop? There is no such thing, at least to the officer making it. While you're stewing behind the wheel because the ticket will cost you a few bucks and you're going to be late for work and your insurance is going up, the cop walking up to your car has to be on high-alert from the time he leaves his squad car until he gets back into it. He has no idea what awaits. You might have a gun. There might be a warrant out on you. You might be strung out on meth. You might be emotionally distressed or mentally ill. You might hate cops. That's the thing. Cops never know. They never truly know what they're walking into. Moszer was the fifth fallen law enforcement officer in the United States this week, a particularly heartbreaking stretch. Two sheriff's deputies were shot to death in Maryland, one in Georgia and another in Colorado. In Maryland, the officers responded to a call in a restaurant. The suspect shot one officer without warning in the restaurant and another during a chase outside. In Georgia, a police officer was shot and killed while trying to serve a warrant on a drug suspect. In Colorado, the deputy was shot multiple times by a 17-year-old. In Fargo, Moszer was one of the officers responding to a domestic disturbance call. Moszer was shot by a suspect who was believed to be threatening his wife. Five men who were protecting the public from bad guys lost their lives. Five men who said goodbye to their families and went to work and never came back home. They were just doing their jobs. So next time you complain about the cops doing this or not doing that or the cops somehow being the problem, remember Jason Moszer. Better yet, remember his wife and children. They are still waiting for him to get home from work.FARGO -- Next time you get pulled over for speeding and gripe about the cop being "unfriendly," think of Jason Moszer.Next time a friend at work complains about the "pig" who gave him the DUI being humorless, think of Jason Moszer.Next time you watch your television set and see crowds of people protesting "out of control" police officers or cops who had to make a split-second decision that turned out tragically, think of Jason Moszer.Jason Moszer, a Fargo police officer, went to work Wednesday. He ended the day being shot by a suspect in a domestic disturbance. Jason Moszer will die.
Perhaps this is why law enforcement officers aren't always as jovial or forgiving or fun-loving as we'd like them to be. Because they can end up being struck by a bullet and dying on a random February day in one of the safest places in America.Moszer leaves behind a wife and two children, three people who'll spend the rest of their lives grieving every day about just another day when their husband and father put on the uniform and went to work.Are you worried about getting killed today at your job?When you kissed your spouse this morning before leaving for work, was there even a passing thought that you might not see them again because you'd be dead by the end of your shift?When you tucked your kids in bed last night, did you think it might be the last time you'd ever do it because you'd get shot at work?Yes, people die every day. And, no, a young cop leaving behind a family is no more tragic or impactful than any other person dying unexpectedly. Families have to push ahead every day after losing a father, mother, husband, wife or child.The difference with cops is that, no matter how rare an incident like this is, they go to work every day with the possibility of somebody trying to hurt them. Or kill them. And perhaps succeeding.A routine traffic stop? There is no such thing, at least to the officer making it. While you're stewing behind the wheel because the ticket will cost you a few bucks and you're going to be late for work and your insurance is going up, the cop walking up to your car has to be on high-alert from the time he leaves his squad car until he gets back into it. He has no idea what awaits. You might have a gun. There might be a warrant out on you. You might be strung out on meth. You might be emotionally distressed or mentally ill. You might hate cops.That's the thing. Cops never know. They never truly know what they're walking into.Moszer was the fifth fallen law enforcement officer in the United States this week, a particularly heartbreaking stretch. Two sheriff's deputies were shot to death in Maryland, one in Georgia and another in Colorado.In Maryland, the officers responded to a call in a restaurant. The suspect shot one officer without warning in the restaurant and another during a chase outside.In Georgia, a police officer was shot and killed while trying to serve a warrant on a drug suspect.In Colorado, the deputy was shot multiple times by a 17-year-old.In Fargo, Moszer was one of the officers responding to a domestic disturbance call. Moszer was shot by a suspect who was believed to be threatening his wife.Five men who were protecting the public from bad guys lost their lives.Five men who said goodbye to their families and went to work and never came back home.They were just doing their jobs.So next time you complain about the cops doing this or not doing that or the cops somehow being the problem, remember Jason Moszer.Better yet, remember his wife and children. They are still waiting for him to get home from work.

Related Topics: POLICE
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