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Port: Instead of adding women to draft, why not get rid of Selective Service?

MINOT -- Way back in 1998, on my birthday, I went down to the post office here in Minot and told the clerk working there that I wanted to register for the draft.[[{"type":"media","view_mode":"media_large","fid":"2612658","attributes":{"alt":"","c...

MINOT - Way back in 1998, on my birthday, I went down to the post office here in Minot and told the clerk working there that I wanted to register for the draft.
I did it because it’s the law. I was scared while I did it because I grew up seeing scars on my father’s body resulting from his service in Vietnam. Service to which he was legally obligated by the draft laws. My father was plucked out of Fairbanks, Alaska, and sent to the jungle to fight in what was perhaps America’s most polarizing war. He came back, to what was at the time a somewhat ungrateful nation, with a chest full of medals but also wounds both seen and unseen which are with him to this day.In 6,264 days my baby boy, barring some change to the law, will also be making a trip down to the local post office (or to the Selective Service website, since that’s an option these days). Thanks to changes to federal law currently being debated in Congress - changes which have strong backing from the military itself - my two daughters may also have to register for the draft.Read more of this column on Rob's blog.MINOT - Way back in 1998, on my birthday, I went down to the post office here in Minot and told the clerk working there that I wanted to register for the draft.
I did it because it’s the law. I was scared while I did it because I grew up seeing scars on my father’s body resulting from his service in Vietnam. Service to which he was legally obligated by the draft laws. My father was plucked out of Fairbanks, Alaska, and sent to the jungle to fight in what was perhaps America’s most polarizing war. He came back, to what was at the time a somewhat ungrateful nation, with a chest full of medals but also wounds both seen and unseen which are with him to this day.In 6,264 days my baby boy, barring some change to the law, will also be making a trip down to the local post office (or to the Selective Service website, since that’s an option these days). Thanks to changes to federal law currently being debated in Congress - changes which have strong backing from the military itself - my two daughters may also have to register for the draft.Read more of this column on Rob's blog.

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