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Port: You almost get the idea we’ve never built a pipeline across a river before

As the protests aimed at stopping the Dakota Access Pipeline, as a means toward ending oil development generally, continue we are inundated with claims that the pipeline represents a risk to clean water.

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Map of hazardous liquid and gas transmission pipelines from the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

As the protests aimed at stopping the Dakota Access Pipeline, as a means toward ending oil development generally, continue we are inundated with claims that the pipeline represents a risk to clean water.

That was certainly the argument from the protesters yesterday who migrated north to the state capitol in Bismarck from where they have been  harassing pipeline workers and law enforcement  along the pipeline route near the Standing Rock reservation .

“We can’t drink oil, keep it in the soil,” the crowd chanted  according to Bismarck Tribune reporter Nick Smith.

Note,  again , that this isn’t so much an anti-pipeline sentiment as an anti-oil position. That’s an important distinction. 

Read the rest of the column here.

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Protest organizer Kristen Kelsch hold a sign and chants across the street from the State Capitol in Bismarck on Thursday. A line of police prevented Kelsch and others from hold the protest to the Dakota Access Pipeline on the Capitol grounds. NICK SMITH / BISMARCK TRIBUNE

Related Topics: DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE
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