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AL JAEGER

For the second time this year a statewide ballot measure has been kept off the ballot due to problems with the signature collection process.
Not only do the term-limits campaigners think North Dakota voters are too stupid to be in charge of their own decision to re-elect incumbents (the whole point of their ballot measure is to limit that choice), but they think we can be bamboozled into ignoring their unethical petitioning processes too.
"Each petition that has been submitted over my 29 years in office has received the same careful review of each signature," Jaeger said in a letter dated Thursday, May 12. "...The claims made in your letter do not change my decision that the petitions are still considered to be insufficient as to the number of signatures required for placement on the November General Election ballot."
A law firm hired by the ballot measure committee has represented Trump associates under investigation by Congress over the Jan. 6, 2021, riot, employs one of Trump's former cabinet members, and represented plaintiffs in other states contesting the outcome of the 2020 election.

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"If you reached a certain level you got an hourly rate that was increased," paid petition circulator Charles Tuttle said during a recent radio interview, referring to increased pay for term limits petitioners based on the number of signatures they collected.
However popular the concept of term limits might be doesn't set aside what the law, up to and including our state constitution, requires of those who would use the initiated measure process. Nobody is above the law.
Of the more than 46,000 signatures turned in, Jaeger's office said they could certify as valid only 17,265.
"I got term limits on the ballot and guess what guys? BCI is doing an investigation on the term limits," one activist behind a constitutional amendment to implement term limits said during a Facebook live stream.
Scott Decker had told me he was considering a campaign when I contacted him in late January, but when I spoke with him today he said he'd decided against a run.
Scott Decker is currently the mayor of Dickinson, having been elected to that position in 2016, and before that he was elected to the Dickinson City Commission in 2014. He's a graduate of Dickinson State University and a 21-year Army veteran.

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The recall proponents would have needed to gather 1,764 signatures from eligible District 24 voters by July, but North Dakota Secretary of State Al Jaeger told Forum News Service they had not turned in any petitions to his office.
Since we're now less than a year away from Election Day 2022, and since Kiefert, should he choose to run, will now be on that ballot, he can't be recalled.
Incumbent Tax Commissioner Ryan Raushcenberger's resignation is effective January 3. By that date, Governor Doug Burgum will have to choose a replacement.

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