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MARK FOX

The Society of Professional Journalists gave Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation leaders this year's Black Hole Award. It's the first time the group has given the award to a tribal government.
Partisan operatives like attorney Tim Purdon — a former member of the Democratic National Committee — would like to portray this case as one in which Native American voters were singled out and marginalized. It's just not true.
In a lawsuit that was inevitable, Native American interests are arguing that North Dakota's new legislative map gives them less representation.
If the problem is vote dilution, why are we trying to solve it with more dilution?

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"Mandah, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation Chairman Mark Fox blocked entry to Lakota women and children on the No DAPL Walk arriving from Standing Rock," veteran Indian Country reporter Brenda Norrell reported on her blog. "Chairman Fox positioned tribal police in a roadblock at the entrance to the tribal compound today, Thursday afternoon, as Lakota women and children arrived on a solidarity walk."
This isn't a magic bullet that will keep DAPL open, but the MHA letter can put a lot of momentum behind the effort to keep it open.
All border well tax revenue has gone to the state — $30 million in the last two years alone — even though the wells extract reservation oil and gas. State representatives have broken their word to the MHA Nation and are now attempting to pass an unfair amendment that would delay equitable tax revenue sharing until July 1, 2023. It is time to correct this historic oversight by passing the original language in Senate Bill 2319.
At stake is more than $200 million in oil and gas royalties the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation says the federal government failed to collect on its behalf and an additional hundreds of millions of dollars involving the value of the riverbed, now covered by Lake Sakakawea, and future royalties.
Public attitudes about gambling are changing. They have been for some time. It is inevitable that North Dakota, like other states, will continue a march toward more liberalized gaming policies. The tribes will need to figure out how to make their casinos attractive and relevant in that environment.
WHITE SHIELD, N.D. — When Ed Hall learned that the Memorial Congregational Church on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation burned down last week, it opened up an old wound.

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The challenges around energy production are many, but so, too, are the solutions. U.S. Rep. Kelly Armstrong hosted an energy stakeholders roundtable Thursday at Bismarck State College's National Energy Center of Excellence. He was joined by State...
BISMARCK -- State and tribal leaders moved closer Wednesday, Feb. 6, to reaching a compromise for sharing tax revenue from oil produced at Fort Berthold, while also establishing a framework for future tribal tax agreements.
WASHINGTON — Legislation introduced by Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., that aims to give Native American tribes greater flexibility to manage their energy resources is headed to President Donald Trump to be signed into law.

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