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WILDLIFE

Owyhee Air Research specializes in manned aerial wildlife research using infrared and remote sensing technology.
You too can use social media and other erroneous sources to research the history behind some of the unusual names in nature.
Hundreds of geese, ducks and eagles have perished already as migration moves north.
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The National Park Service should protect the genetic diversity of the historic horse herd at Theodore Roosevelt National Park, advocates say.

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Latest Headlines
Lauren Limke, a legislative correspondent for North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven, had an up-close experience with one of the foxes that have made a home on Capitol Hill this past week.
Phone calls and tips from friends and strangers lead Granite Falls couple on journeys around the state and other states for the sake of that perfect picture.
Toxic lead from hunters' ammunition is impacting eagle population, researchers say.
A federal judge ruled the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service moved wrongly to remove wolves from the federal endangered list.
Gilligan, the juvenile loon who was stranded on a lake in the Crow Wing Lake chain near Nevis in early December when much of the lake iced over, was seen flying away from Dec. 19 by two people who were ice fishing in the area where Gilligan had been sighted.
The Winter Severity Index at Norris Camp southeast of Warroad, Minnesota, was 61 as of Tuesday, Jan. 25. That's higher than the average of 42 for this time of the winter, but still below the winters of 1995-96 and 1996-97, which set a benchmark for winter severity in recent times.

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Feeding wildlife, especially during the winter in North Dakota, once was common practice embraced by most wildlife professionals. That philosophy has gradually evolved.
Slocum Taxidermy opened in 1995; has grown to include customers throughout Midwest, including Scheels.
Bryan and Bryce Sombke, who promote a 500-acre natural bird hunting and gun dog enterprise near Conde, South Dakota, and help on the family’s 2,000-acre farm, were among those hit in an unusual Aug. 28, 2021, hail storm. The storm brought high winds and softball-sized hail, and killed deer and decimated the bird population, as well as flattening 7- to 8-foot-tall corn and Conservation Reserve Program lands.

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