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ND summarizes pheasant brood data

North Dakota's roadside pheasant survey conducted in late July and August indicates total birds and number of broods are up statewide from 2013. Stan Kohn, North Dakota Game and Fish Department upland game supervisor, said the survey shows total ...

Pheasant
North Dakota Game and Fish Department Photo North Dakota Game and Fish Department pheasant surveys indicate an increase of 30 percent from last year.

North Dakota’s roadside pheasant survey conducted in late July and August indicates total birds and number of broods are up statewide from 2013.
Stan Kohn, North Dakota Game and Fish Department upland game supervisor, said the survey shows total pheasants are up 30 percent from last year.
In addition, brood observations were up 37 percent, while the average brood size was down 4 percent. The summary is based on 253 survey runs made along 106 brood routes across North Dakota.
“With the good spring weather for most of the nesting and early brooding period, I suspected a better production year and it looks like it did occur,” Kohn said in a release.
Even though average brood size is down slightly in all districts, Kohn said the number of broods observed will in most cases offset the small decline.
“Late-summer roadside counts indicate pheasant hunters are going to find more pheasants in most parts of the state, with more young roosters showing up in the fall population,” he said.
Statistics from southwestern North Dakota indicate total pheasants were up 22 percent and broods observed up 23 percent from 2013. Observers counted 19 broods and 154 birds per 100 survey miles. The average brood size was 5.7.
Results from the southeast show birds are up 2 percent from last year, and the number of broods up 16 percent. Observers counted six broods and 50 birds per 100 miles. The average brood size was 5.4.
Statistics from the northwest indicated pheasants are up 21 percent from last year, with broods up 26 percent. Observers recorded seven broods and 57 birds per 100 miles. Average brood size was 5.1.
The northeast district, generally containing secondary pheasant habitat, with much of it lacking good winter cover, showed two broods and 16 birds per 100 miles. Average brood size was 4.2. Number of birds observed was up 126 percent, and the number of broods recorded was up 166 percent.
The 2014 regular pheasant season opens Oct. 11 and continues through Jan. 4. The two-day youth pheasant hunting weekend, when legally licensed residents and nonresidents ages 15 and younger can hunt statewide, is set for Oct. 4-5.

Related Topics: HUNTING
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