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North Dakota Game and Fish promotes youth pheasant season opportunities

Hunters 12 and older need to have passed a certified hunter education course or obtain an apprentice hunter validation, which allows a person to hunt small game for one license year without completing hunter education.

Tad Schmidt and kids
As part of North Dakota's youth pheasant season, an adult at least 18 years old must accompany young hunters in the field but cannot carry a firearm. North Dakota's 2022 youth pheasant season is Saturday, Oct. 1, and Sunday, Oct. 2.
Brad Dokken/Grand Forks Herald
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BISMARCK – North Dakota’s two-day youth pheasant season, set for Saturday, Oct. 1, and Sunday, Oct. 2, is a great opportunity to introduce a new hunter to the outdoors with limited competition, the Game and Fish Department said.

That’s when legally licensed residents and nonresidents 15 and younger can hunt rooster pheasants statewide. An adult at least 18 must accompany the youth hunter in the field. The adult may not carry a firearm.

Resident youth hunters must possess a fishing, hunting and furbearer certificate and general game and habitat license. Nonresident youth hunters from states that provide a reciprocal licensing agreement for North Dakota residents qualify for North Dakota resident licenses. Otherwise, nonresident youth hunters must purchase a nonresident small game license.

Hunters 12 and older need to have passed a certified hunter education course or obtain an apprentice hunter validation, which allows a person to hunt small game for one license year without completing hunter education.

The daily bag limit and all other regulations for the regular pheasant season apply. See the North Dakota 2022-23 Hunting and Trapping Guide for additional information.

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Brad Dokken joined the Herald company in November 1985 as a copy editor for Agweek magazine and has been the Grand Forks Herald's outdoors editor since 1998.

Besides his role as an outdoors writer, Dokken has an extensive background in northwest Minnesota and Canadian border issues and provides occasional coverage on those topics.

Reach him at bdokken@gfherald.com, by phone at (701) 780-1148 or on Twitter at @gfhoutdoor.
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