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Notebook: NFL awards Super Bowls to Atlanta, Los Angeles, Miami

The NFL officially awarded future Super Bowls to Atlanta, Miami and Los Angeles on Tuesday.Atlanta was selected to play host to Super Bowl LIII in 2019, Miami to Super Bowl LIV in 2020 and Los Angeles to Super Bowl LV in 2021.The sites were annou...

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Philadelphia quarterback Carson Wentz sets up to throw during OTS’s on Tuesday at the NovaCare Complex. (Photo by Bill Streicher / USA TODAY Sports)

The NFL officially awarded future Super Bowls to Atlanta, Miami and Los Angeles on Tuesday.
Atlanta was selected to play host to Super Bowl LIII in 2019, Miami to Super Bowl LIV in 2020 and Los Angeles to Super Bowl LV in 2021.
The sites were announced at the annual NFL owners’ meetings in Charlotte, N.C.
In January, the Rams returned to Los Angeles after a 21-year absence and will move into a new $2.4 billion stadium on the site of the old Hollywood Park racetrack in Inglewood, Calif., about 10 miles from downtown Los Angeles, in 2019.
Los Angeles hosted the NFL’s first Super Bowl in 1967. The Los Angeles area has hosted seven Super Bowls but has not played host since 1993 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.
- Former All-Pro defensive end Charles “Bubba” Smith is the latest former NFL player to be diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy.
The Concussion Legacy Foundation web site reported the results, which were released Tuesday with the permission from Smith’s estate. Smith is the 90th former NFL player found to have CTE by researchers at the Boston University brain bank.
Researchers say Smith showed symptoms of Stage 3 (out of 4) CTE. Among those symptoms: cognitive impairment and difficulty with judging and planning.
Smith died in 2011 at the age of 66 due to an overdose of phentermine - a weight loss drug. The Baltimore Colts made Smith the top overall pick in the draft in 1967. He also played for the Oakland Raiders and Houston Oilers.
- Expanded instant replay was approved at the NFL Owners meetings with a focus on preventing administrative issues.
The changes are not the extensive overhaul of instant replay proposed by the Baltimore Ravens but the expansion of communication to correct mistakes related to the game clock, down and distance and penalty yardage represent new additions to what the NFL defines as reviewable. The adopted proposal was made by the league’s competition committee.
Beginning with the 2016 season, the following plays are reviewable: any score, interception, fumble or backward pass recovered by an opponent or out of bounds, muffed scrimmage kick (punt). Initiating a challenge when not permitted to do so results in the loss of a timeout. If the team is out of timeouts, it will be penalized 15 yards.
- The Tennessee Titans lost offensive lineman Byron Bell for the season on the first day of Organized Team Activities with a serious ankle injury.
“I know it’s dislocated,” Titans coach Mike Mularkey said. “I don’t know all the medical terms. He’ll be out for this season.”
Bell started all 16 games last season (seven at left guard, eight at right tackle and one at left tackle) and was expected to be a veteran presence this year among three new starters.
- Cincinnati Bengals tight end Tyler Eifert will undergo surgery on his ailing left ankle, according to the Cincinnati Enquirer.
Eifert, 25, suffered the injury nearly four months ago in the Pro Bowl and it hasn’t healed.
The upcoming surgery is expected to sideline Eifert for approximately three months, which means he will miss a large chunk of training camp. Eifert caught 52 passes for 615 yards and 13 touchdowns last season.
- With a black bandage on his left thumb, Mark Sanchez took reps with the first-team offense in his initial full-team workout with the Denver Broncos.
Sanchez returned one week ahead of schedule to participate in the workout as part of the defending champion Broncos’ organized team activities schedule.
Notably absent was Super Bowl 50 MVP Von Miller, who continues to steer clear of offseason workouts while the sides work on his contract.
- The Cleveland Browns signed wide receiver David Richards.
Richards played at Arizona where he compiled 110 receptions and 11 touchdowns.
He signed with the Atlanta Falcons as an undrafted free agent earlier this month, but was released.
- The Miami Dolphins signed two more 2016 NFL draft picks, adding third-round receiver Leonte Carroo and seventh-round tight end Thomas Duarte.
Carroo was the No. 87 overall pick after starting 22 of 44 career games at Rutgers and becoming the school’s career leader in receiving touchdowns with 29. He totaled 122 receptions for 2,373 yards in four seasons at the school.
Duarte started for two years at UCLA and played in 38 career games, finishing with 97 receptions for 1,626 yards and 17 touchdowns.

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