ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Midgets host Coca-Cola Classic track and field meet 

Athletes from across the state traveled to Dickinson to compete in a meet dampened by strong winds and chilled temperatures.

DSC01893.JPG
Dickinson High School hosted their Coca Cola Classic track and field meet on Friday, April 8.
Josiah C. Cuellar / The Dickinson Press
We are part of The Trust Project.

DICKINSON — With the exception of uncooperative weather, the Dickinson High School Coca-Cola Classic track and field meet met expectations — and surpassed a few.

As the mid-morning events began in the field portion of the meet competitors representing Bismarck Century, Dickinson, Jamestown, Watford City, Williston and two teams from the East Dakota Conference, West Fargo and Shanley threw, jumped and vaulted their way into a tightly contested event. By the afternoon, with winds howling from the southeast, track competitions began for both varsity and junior varsity teams.

To call Bismarck Century's performance anything short of golden would be an understatement, as the Patriots consistently placed at the front-end of majority of the events.

Taking first place in 17 varsity events, the Patriots also garnered 11 gold medals at the junior varsity level field events.

DSC01351.JPG
Jazmin Barry takes third places in long jump and triple jump for the girls varsity competition.
Josiah C. Cuellar / The Dickinson Press

The Midgets weren't without their own moments of shine, as varsity pole vaulter Jack Homiston cleared 13 feet to take first, while silver would also go to the Midgets in junior Benett Carlson who cleared 12 feet 6 inches. In female vaulting, junior Emily Ash claimed the top spot on the podium with her 9 feet 9 inches.

ADVERTISEMENT

DSC02452.JPG
Emily Ash stands highest on the winners' podium after successfully clearing 9-09.
Josiah C. Cuellar / The Dickinson Press

Jamestown’s senior Anthonett Nabwe was a standout in the girls varsity field events, showing tremendous strength in claiming first place and season records in shot put at 44-01 and in discus at125-10.

The 100 meters competition was won by the Packers’ Carson Hegerle (11.46), followed by Quentin Lewis of Dickinson (11.53) and Century’s Brook Turner (11.65).

In the 200 meters, Lewis (22.01) led the pack and was able to get one back on the West Fargo senior (22.45) who took second. Third place was yet another Patriot athlete in senior Drew Kelsch (22.91).

Junior varsity showed promise as stand-out performances by up-and-coming athletes like freshmen Caleb Swisher and Zackary Nodland indicated future successes for Dickinson. Nodland placed second in the 100 meters (12:48) behind Jamestown sophomore Sam Mayhair (12.40), while Hart contributed gold to Williston in the 800 meters and 1600 meters, followed by Swisher in both competitions.

DSC02210.JPG
Quentin Lewis took first place in the 200 meter competition, second in the 100 meter dash.
Josiah C. Cuellar / The Dickinson Press

Century, continuing their high caliber performance, nearly swept the relay races in both boys and girls contests, and would have swept the competition were it not for Williston inched victories in both the 4x800 boys (8:12.79) and girls (10:10.74) competitions.

The Midgets took the bronze in the 4x400 (3:43.44) with their upperclassmen of runners, seniors Kaden Selle, Lewis, Homiston and junior Carlson. They trailed behind Williston (3:33.13), who crossed the finish line three seconds after Century(3:30.45).

Josiah C. Cuellar was born in San Angelo, Texas, a small rural community in the western part of the state known for its farming, ranching and beautiful Concho River. A Texas A&M San Antonio graduate specializing in multi-media reporting, Cuellar is an award winning photographer and reporter whose work focuses on community news and sports.
What to read next
The board unanimously voted Thursday to formally accept — not approve — the proposed three-class basketball system as presented and will now move forward with studies of finance and the impact to existing or new staff.
Members Only
"We make each other compete way harder than we could ever push ourselves on our own,” Luke Shobe said.