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WILDLIFE

Feeding wildlife, especially during the winter in North Dakota, once was common practice embraced by most wildlife professionals. That philosophy has gradually evolved.
Slocum Taxidermy opened in 1995; has grown to include customers throughout Midwest, including Scheels.
Bryan and Bryce Sombke, who promote a 500-acre natural bird hunting and gun dog enterprise near Conde, South Dakota, and help on the family’s 2,000-acre farm, were among those hit in an unusual Aug. 28, 2021, hail storm. The storm brought high winds and softball-sized hail, and killed deer and decimated the bird population, as well as flattening 7- to 8-foot-tall corn and Conservation Reserve Program lands.
Wisconsin DNR naturalist Ryan Brady travels across northern Wisconsin looking after some of the state’s lesser-known and definitely lesser-seen creatures.

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The mysterious stranger toddled into Noreen and Lee Thomas's yard last Monday, looking tall and pale and beady-eyed. They didn't know how long he planned to stay; he carried nothing but a gray pouch. But for the next three days, Kevin, the White American Pelican, terrified the chickens, schooled the dogs and followed the Thomases around as if they were walleye vending machines.
Across Minnesota as a whole the 2021 drought has inched into the top 10. But in the far north the situation is much dryer.
Across Minnesota, Wisconsin and Ontario, southern flying squirrels are pushing their cousins north.
New federal grant aids effort to save species from extirpation.
Populations of some turtle species are dwindling with roadway mortality a leading cause.
Thursday morning, on the last day of school for students in Roseau, a deer crashed through the window of the nurse’s office before scrambling out the office door, down the hallway and through the north door of the elementary school back into the wild.

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In Minnesota's far southwest, you can find bison ... and cacti?
Since March, rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus has killed wild, feral and domestic rabbits in the southwest United States.

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