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ABORTION

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Abortion became a hugely contentious issue because the courts took away our ability to answer this policy question through the democratic process. The last thing we need is for Congress to similarly rob us of that ability.
Last month, Burleigh County District Judge Bruce Romanick blocked the state's abortion ban from taking effect.
Judges are often held up as safety nets in the policy-making process. Should they be?
"My vision for the office is not centered around the courtroom," Kim Hegvik, the assistant Cass County prosecutor running to replace current State's Attorney Birch Burdick, said on this episode of Plain Talk. Also, Cody Schuler from the ACLU of North Dakota joined to discuss what our debate over the abortion question may look like going forward.
At Friday's hearing, attorneys representing the Red River Women's Clinic told Judge Bruce Romanick that North Dakota's trigger law violates the state's constitution and if allowed to stand would bring an end to 50 years of abortion access.
"What happened in Texas and Louisiana will happen to women in North Dakota after the state’s abortion ban goes into effect later this month," writes columnist Jim Shaw. "The fact that abortion is still legal in neighboring Minnesota will be of little help."

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The clinic that provides abortion services is vacating its downtown Fargo location in anticipation of North Dakota's abortion "trigger" law taking effect Aug. 26 following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that nullified Roe v. Wade.
Now that Roe v. Wade is no more, and the democratic process has engaged, we're going to be learning a lot about how Americans feel about abortion. I think we're going to find out that they are not nearly so pro-life or pro-choice as we've been led to believe.
Plans moving forward to put constitutional amendment before voters in 2024 to preserve access to abortion in the state. Two previous statewide elections, in 2006 and 2008, rejected legislative efforts to ban abortion in most cases.

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