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CARBON CAPTURE

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Summit Carbons Solutions has described its five-state, 2,000 mile carbon capture pipeline as being a $4.5 billion project. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage. But some landowners in the path of pipeline are unwilling to even let pipeline survey crews onto their property.
A group of farmers near Leola, South Dakota, and Aberdeen, South Dakota, say they are ethanol supporters but that the proposed Summit Carbon Solutions pipeline will cause them far more than what the company is paying for easements. They also say the lurking threat of eminent domain is inappropriate because the pipeline is not for a public utility. They think the long-term strategy of installing a pipeline to satisfy what may be of environmentally uncertain value is wrong, substituting their loss for likely a temporary gain for ethanol and pipeline investors.
Red Trail Energy CEO Gerald Bachmeier sees a bright future for carbon capture. "For North Dakota's industries, I think we have a huge opportunity."
Red Trail Energy, LLC announced that it officially began carbon capture and storage at its ethanol facility located near Richardton, North Dakota, on June 16.
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its $4.5 billion pipeline project will help ethanol plants lower their carbon score. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage. But a lawyer is trying to keep Summit off the land owned by his clients.
This ruling "increases the odds that you're going to see carbon capture on some of our projects," says Jason Bohrer, president of the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council.

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Terracoh will build a pilot project in western North Dakota to demonstrate its technology for combining captured carbon dioxide and geothermal energy. The technology was developed at the University of Minnesota.
The decision means carbon pipeline companies must file for a siting permit with the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission. Without statewide authority, permitting would have been left up to individual counties along the pipeline route.
Summit Carbon Solutions is proposing to build the world's largest carbon capture and sequestration project. Ethanol plants in Atwater and Granite Falls, Minnesota, are part of the project.

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