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CLIMATE CHANGE

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During the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season — one of the most active on record — climate change boosted hourly rainfall rates in hurricane-force storms by 8%-11%, according to an April 2022 study in the journal Nature Communications.
Saturday will kick off an arduous process that could extend into early next week, with senators offering amendment after amendment in a time-consuming "vote-a-rama."
Bison that lived 3,000 years ago were 37% larger than those living today because of a warming climate — a trend that will accelerate, with bison projected to become 46% smaller by the end of the century. Bison are shaggy sentinels of climate change on the prairie.
The ESG movement which is taking the investment world by storm can hurt North Dakota in more ways than one, as state Treasurer Thomas Beadle explains on this episode of Plain Talk.
Red Trail Energy CEO Gerald Bachmeier sees a bright future for carbon capture. "For North Dakota's industries, I think we have a huge opportunity."
This ruling "increases the odds that you're going to see carbon capture on some of our projects," says Jason Bohrer, president of the North Dakota Lignite Energy Council.

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The commitment, published at the end of three days of talks, was weaker than a previous draft of the final communique seen by Reuters, which had included a target to end unabated coal power generation by 2030. Sources familiar with the discussions said Japan and the United States had both indicated they could not support that date.
John Kerry said progress was vital as Egypt prepares to host the next round of U.N. climate talks, known as COP27, in November in Sharm el-Sheikh.
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W. Carter Johnson first began studying the ecology of the Dakotas as a graduate student at North Dakota State University in the 1960s and early '70s. His new book offers a survey of the region's natural history and the many ways in which humans have altered the land.

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