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FARMING

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It's the middle of hay season in southwestern North Dakota. With a much wetter spring and early summer, ranchers are experiencing a better hay cut than last year. We visited with JC Farms to learn more about what goes into haying.
Maci Wehri, of Hebron, North Dakota, was recently crowned as Miss Agriculture USA. Wehri is also going to be a junior at Dickinson State University. We visited Wehri at her family’s farm in Hebron to learn about her passion for agriculture.
As kids, we spent many summers bumping along the dirt roads in Dad’s pickup as he patrolled creeks and ditches — ever vigilant to any splash of yellow representing leafy spurge. He would screech to a halt and we'd trot to the back of the truck to pull out hoses so we could douse every offending patch with herbicide. These days, we are more prone to limping than trotting. But we're still spraying spurge, Tammy Swift says.
We rode along the fields in Fairfield, speaking to a local rancher/farmer about this year’s planting season and how the heavy rains in the past month have affected crops.
Gates and his trust will own the land, and the family who sold it to him will farm it, and that's all legal under the law.
Where's the support for property rights?

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Wagyu beef raised at Fellers Ranch is processed at the Conger Meat Market. The ranch and the meat market are less than 10 miles apart, but the company has been finding customers from far and wide.
Hollie Wilson is in the process of repairing some barns on her property near South Heart after the recent blizzards left some devastating damage to the 1970s structures. After a Facebook post went viral during the storm, Wilson has received endless comments from around the world, which has prompted an individual to start a GoFundMe page to support her barn repair costs.
Croplands in the Upper Great Plains expanded 584,600 acres per year between 2015 and 2019, while grasslands contracted at an annual rate of 448,600 acres over the same span.

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