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HISTORY

When you only have 3 or 4 stations, you tend to hear the same commercials over and over again, and boy do we remember them. "Back Then" columnist Tracy Briggs wants to know your favorites.
"Did You Know That" columnist Curt Eriksmoen concludes the story of Bishop William Walker.
Before Title IX, some schools got creative with activities for the female students.
Prairie Outpost Park has several fascinating buildings, including the South Heart train depot and a Scandinavian stabbur. We spoke with Dickinson Museum Director Bob Fuhrman to learn more about the renovation and the rich history behind these structures.

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The Tanis site near Bowman, North Dakota, offers evidence of the catastrophic events that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs. NOVA programs to air Wednesday, May 11.
In 1890, a railroad "Cathedral Car" drew worshippers in the new state of North Dakota.
For Memorial Day, an American military cemetery in Cambridge wants to honor the Americans (including North Dakotans and Minnesotans) who are buried there with photos beside their grave markers. Maybe you know one of these men.
Remains of U.S. service members who died in a Tokyo military prison fire in 1945 are undergoing DNA analysis at a laboratory in Hawaii.
"Did You Know That" columnist Curt Eriksmoen concludes the story of Gerald P. Nye, whose strong isolationist policies put him at odds with many voters in the 1940s.
When a gunman killed a police officer in Hope, North Dakota, in 1933, the county sheriff wasn't about to take it lying down. He persisted to track the suspect for two years over seven states and thousands of miles -- one of the most highly publicized manhunts in U.S. history.

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Religious leaders in the Fargo-Moorhead area and across the country face hard questions about how denominations, including Catholic, Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian, Quaker and Unitarian, worked with federal officials to strip Native American children of their cultural traditions at boarding schools.
They endured long hours in the snow and cold. Whatever happened to the high school boys who tried to make seesaw history?
"Did You Know That" columnist Curt Eriksmoen continues the story of Gerald P. Nye.

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