ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

VAULT - HISTORICAL

Famed frontier lawman Seth Bullock established the first hotel in the historic mining town. Now fully renovated, the hotel is still chock-full of history, mysteries and legends.
A look into some of the personalities that created the legend of Deadwood, one of the Wild West's most infamous towns.
InForum history columnist Curt Eriksmoen concludes the story of William Jennings Gardner, a North Dakota-born football player who crossed paths with Jim Thorpe and helped take down Al Capone.
Officials called it 'the most baffling and mysterious fire cases' in the state's history. Who or what was responsible?

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
Where did Al Capone and other mobsters hunker down in in the Upper Midwest? Who was 'Creepy' Karpis? What happened in the Bohn kidnapping? All these stories and more in Best of The Vault 2022.
In what was considered at the time the worst storm in 48 years, western North Dakota was bombarded with 20 inches of snow and 36 mph wind gusts.
Few are aware of how active vigilantes were in 1880s Dakota Territory. Ron Berget's book, "Montana Stranglers in Dakota Territory," tells a largely forgotten story.
Eighteen miles northwest of Bemidji, in the backwoods of Buzzle Township, is Pinewood — once an operative logging camp filled with lumberjacks and early settlers. Throughout its history, this once lively community has become a place of unsolved mysteries, two bank robberies, a bizarre train derailment and multiple wildfires.
In the 1920s, Engolf Snortland started running with a bad crowd, later kidnapped the wrong man, and went to prison. He moved home to North Dakota for a fresh start, only to be shot dead. In the years to come, the fallout from his unusual case would reach the state Supreme Court and inspire groundbreaking legislation in North Dakota.
The only known flyer from the doomed show in Minnesota became the most expensive concert poster sold at auction. Buddy Holly and several other musicians died on their way to the show in 1959.

ADVERTISEMENT

Members of the Sundance Kid’s gang failed to get away with the goods when they tried to rob the Butte County Bank in Belle Fourche, South Dakota.
Author and archivist Jeffrey Sauve has delved into the curious and difficult case that stumped Duluth detectives for years.
Exclusive
Haskell Bohn, heir to a refrigeration fortune, lay face down on the ground as his kidnappers drove away into a dark summer night, in Minnesota, 1932, according to a police transcript exclusively obtained recently by Forum News Service. He had been ransomed. It was the end of Bohn's ordeal. His captors wouldn't get away with their crime.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT