SAVE TODAY! SUBSCRIBE NOW. $1 for 6 months of unlimited news

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

WeatherTalk: Elevation is key to a mountain weather forecast

It is common for winter storms to bring rain to lower elevations and snow to the tops of the mountains.

Weather Talk.jpg

Here in the Great Plains, winter storms usually bring snow but can bring rain or a mixture of the two. However, in the mountainous regions of the western United States, it is common for winter storms to bring rain to lower elevations and snow to the tops of the mountains. In between, winter precipitation often goes back and forth, even during the course of a storm. From California to British Columbia, winter forecasts include a forecast of the rain-snow transition line. It is given as an elevation.

A typical winter storm forecast might read like this: Rain, heavy at times tonight. Snow above 4,000 feet with 10 to 18 inches expected. Heavy rain tomorrow with the snow line increasing to 7,000 feet. Twelve to 20 inches of snow higher elevations. People who live in mountainous regions, of course, are used to such forecasts and are well-aware of their elevation.

Related Topics: WEATHERWEATHERTALK
What to read next
The National Weather Service says the western portion of the Red River Valley will experience "near blizzard conditions," and a winter weather advisory has been issued for much of the eastern part of the state, all the way from Wahpeton to the Turtle Mountains, from 11 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Tuesday.
In February of 1895, one to two feet fell from Galveston to New Orleans along with blowing snow and temperatures in the teens.
Scientific studies are inconclusive as to whether or not this actually works as intended.
The actual moment of the full moon is Monday evening.